What Type Of Hypersensitivity Is Serum Sickness?

What are the 4 types of hypersensitivity?

Type I: Immediate Hypersensitivity (Anaphylactic Reaction) These allergic reactions are systemic or localized, as in allergic dermatitis (e.g., hives, wheal and erythema reactions).

Type II: Cytotoxic Reaction (Antibody-dependent) …

Type III: Immune Complex Reaction.

Type IV: Cell-Mediated (Delayed Hypersensitivity).

Is serum sickness an autoimmune disease?

Serum sickness is an immune complex–mediated hypersensitivity reaction characterized by fever, rash, arthritis, arthralgia, and other systemic symptoms. … With regard to patient education on serum sickness, the patient and his or her family should be advised of the nature of the offending agent.

Can hypersensitivity be cured?

There is no cure for hypersensitivity vasculitis itself. The main goal of treatment will be to relieve your symptoms. … If mild anti-inflammatory medications fail to relieve symptoms, your doctor may also prescribe corticosteroids. Corticosteroids are drugs that suppress your immune system and reduce inflammation.

What is serum sickness?

Serum sickness is a reaction that is similar to an allergy. The immune system reacts to medicines that contain proteins used to treat immune conditions. It can also react to antiserum, the liquid part of blood that contains antibodies given to a person to help protect them against germs or poisonous substances.

How is serum sickness diagnosed?

To distinguish between the two conditions, your doctor will likely start by looking at your rash. A rash caused by a serum sickness-like reaction is usually very itchy and develops a bruise-like coloring. Your doctor may also test your blood for the presence of immune complexes.

How do you treat serum sickness?

Treatment for serum sickness is aimed at reducing symptoms. Your doctor may prescribe antihistamines or analgesics (NSAIDs), along with topical medications to relieve itching or rash. In serious cases, your doctor may prescribe corticosteroids, such as prednisone. Normally, there is no need for hospitalization.

What is the hypersensitivity?

Hypersensitivity reactions are an overreaction of the immune system to an antigen which would not normally trigger an immune response. The antigen may be something which would in most people be ignored – peanuts, for example, or it may originate from the body.

What is a Type 2 hypersensitivity reaction?

Type II Hypersensitivity. Type II hypersensitivity is an antibody-dependent process in which specific antibodies bind to antigens, resulting in tissue damage or destruction (see Fig. … If the antigen is present on cell surfaces, antibody binding can result in cell lysis through the in situ fixation of complement.

How long does serum sickness reaction last?

Serum sickness usually improves in 7 to 10 days, with full recovery in 2 to 4 weeks. However, it may lead to nervous system disorders and a life-threatening allergic reaction called anaphylaxis, so it is important to get medical treatment.

Does serum sickness get worse?

Prognosis/Possible Complications. Serum sickness usually improves in 7 to 10 days, with full recovery in 2 to 4 weeks. However, it may lead to nervous system disorders and a life-threatening allergic reaction called anaphylaxis, so it is important to get medical treatment.

Is rheumatoid arthritis a type 4 hypersensitivity?

Type IV Hypersensitivity Reactions Antigen is taken up, processed, and presented by macrophages or dendritic cells. … TH17 cells have been implicated in contact dermatitis, atopic dermatitis, asthma, and rheumatoid arthritis.

What are the signs and symptoms of hypersensitivity?

Signs and symptoms of acute, subacute, and chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis may include flu-like illness including fever, chills, muscle or joint pain, or headaches; rales; cough; chronic bronchitis; shortness of breath; anorexia or weight loss; fatigue; fibrosis of the lungs; and clubbing of fingers or toes.

Can you get serum sickness from a bee sting?

Delayed Reaction to an Insect Sting Reactions occurring more than four hours after a bee or other insect sting are classified as delayed reactions. There have been isolated reports of serum sickness-like syndromes occurring about a week after a sting.

What is an example of delayed hypersensitivity?

Examples of DTH reactions are contact dermatitis (eg, poison ivy rash), tuberculin skin test reactions, granulomatous inflammation (eg, sarcoidosis, Crohn disease), allograft rejection, graft versus host disease, and autoimmune hypersensitivity reactions.

What is the cause of a delayed allergic reaction?

One type of immune reaction is due to production of antibodies called Immunoglobulin E (IgE) specific to the drug. … These T cells orchestrate a delayed immune response that most often affects the skin, causing itchy rashes, and occurs days to weeks after exposure to the drug.