Harvard-trained neuroscientist stroke of insight

Jill Bolte Taylor Bids Farewell to Her Beloved Mother, G.G

Harvard-trained neuroscientist stroke of insight

Jill Bolte Taylor and her mother, G.G. Photo by Kip May

In 1996, at the age of 37, Jill Bolte Taylor, a Harvard-trained neuroscientist, experienced a massive stroke.

She documented her eight-year recovery in My Stroke of Insight: A Brain Scientist’s Personal Journey, a New York Times best-seller that has been published in more than 30 languages.

It was a long road back, and through it all she had the love and incredible support of her mother, G.G. —the editor

BY JILL BOLTE TAYLOR

I was working on a limestone sculpture titled Role Reversal back in June when my beloved mother, Gladys “G.G.” Taylor, was given her terminal diagnosis. Of course, this shifting dynamic in caregiving occurs for many mother-daughter relationships, but because G.G. helped raise me twice, once as a child and again as a stroke survivor at the age of 37, it was especially poignant.

I wanted to co-create, with G.G. and our entire community of friends and family, a passage that would honor her life in a revolutionary way. Together we embarked on a journey that would mark the end of a life well-lived, with a death of dignity, joy, love, celebration, and true honor.

First, we decided to fill our home with joy and love, rather than sadness and fear. It was our priority to honor all of our feelings, open our hearts, expand our consciousness, accentuate the good in the world, create community, demonstrate the coexistence of joy and grief — thereby bringing death the shadows and into the light.

Second, we invited friends and family, through social media, to send cards of kindness and encouragement — with a focus on celebration and gratitude rather than sadness or loss. Hundreds of cards poured in, cheering G.G. on in her grand finale.

Third, we shared our journey by posting photos and stories of both our highs and lows on . We were helped deeply by our loving community.

Finally, as her health waned, we invited 35 loved ones into our home for an unforgettable night of decorating G.G.’s special Box of Love — the container she would be cremated in. G.G.

, dressed in bright colors and wearing leis around her neck, presided over the party royalty. Although most of us will never hear the memories and appreciations spoken at our memorial service, we all took turns sitting at G.G.

’s side, showering her with heartfelt recognition, and in return received her amazing “mama love.”

Loved ones gathered with G.G. to celebrate her life and decorate her Box of Love, in which she would be cremated. Photo by Merridee LaMantia

At the end of the evening, G.G. beamed with pride, gratitude, and delight as she danced around her Box of Love to Benny Goodman playing “Stomping at the Savoy.

” It had been her go-to song throughout her life whenever she needed her spirits lifted. Watching G.G.

dance around the box with people who loved her was one of the most touching and meaningful moments in our lives, and for many it was both life and death changing.

G.G. led a fabulous life and lived her dream of being a mathematics professor at Indiana State University. Her final wish was that we celebrate her life by dancing to “Stomping at the Savoy” upon pressing the button at the crematorium.

Not only did approximately 40 locals stomp onsite, but thanks to social media, our friends all around the world — in places as diverse as New Zealand, Antarctica, Paris, Turkey, and Costa Rica — synchronized their clocks to ours, and danced their happy dance for one minute as we enthusiastically ignited her from one form into another. It was a worldwide salute to a beautiful woman’s life.

There is a universal human longing to be deeply seen for all we are, and a life well-lived is worthy of true celebration. Grief is a beautiful part of our being, and when our grief is balanced with our joy, true celebration and transformation can happen.

(Our heartfelt gratitude to Hospice.)

Source: http://www.magbloom.com/2016/04/jill-bolte-taylor-bids-farewell/

Dr. Jill Bolte Taylor: A Work of Art Her Words

Harvard-trained neuroscientist stroke of insight

Dr. Jill Bolte Taylor flew in to New York for the shoot of the chorus’s new mini-documentary, Of Two Minds, about the creation of the choral/orchestral work Fifty Million Molecular Geniuses. Jeanne Wikler interviewed her.

Dr. Taylor exudes a quiet sparkle.

Picking her up at LaGuardia Airport for the video shoot the next day, I couldn’t mistake her amongst the crowd of departing passengers: tall and slim, with long, flowing white-blonde hair, a generous smile and arms stretched out for a hug.

She showed no trace of fatigue even though she had flown across the country and back twice that week. She will turn sixty on the weekend of May 3rd, when the work, Fifty Trillion Molecular Geniuses, has its world premiere in Carnegie Hall.

After checking her into her hotel, we sat in the café downstairs for a chat.

Despite her fame and celebrity – her 2008 book was a New York Times Best Seller, her TED Talk the first ever to go viral, and she was listed that year by TIME Magazine as one of the “100 Most Influential People in the World” – she has a modest, unpretentious manner and the midwestern accent of her hometown, Bloomington, Indiana.

Jill Bolte Taylor: I’m so excited at the idea of celebrating my 60th birthday with a work of art my words, and in Carnegie Hall, no less! I’ve actually never been there before. When I turned 50, I had a huge party with all my friends, but I didn’t want to do that again this time. I thought I’d just spend my birthday on my boat, alone with God. And my dog.

Jeanne Wikler: How did you react when the request from the twin composers Brad and Doug Balliett came in, to use your book and TED Talk as a basis for a choral work featuring The Cecilia Chorus of New York?

Taylor: I was thrilled. So many people have responded in so many different ways, and several people have approached me with ideas for an opera or a ballet, and now this musical piece.

It thrills my soul that it means enough for people to invest their time and energy and expertise into bringing my words into a more artistic realm.

Tomorrow at the video shoot I get to meet The Balliett Brothers for the first time. I’m so excited!

Dr. Taylor—or Dr. Jill, as she is often called—is a Harvard-trained neuroscientist specialized in the anatomy of the brain. Waking up one morning to go to work at the Harvard Brain Bank when she was 37, she experienced a massive stroke in the left hemisphere of her brain.

Within four hours she lost the ability to walk, talk, read, write, or recall any of her life. But by harnessing the powers of her uninjured ‘right brain’ she was able to call for help, and to understand and indicate what she needed to completely recover, though it took her eight years.

 For the next two years she was deluged by calls for help and advice by stroke survivors and caregivers. So she delivered a TED Talk (My Stroke of Insight), explaining in both scientific and personal detail what had happened to her and how she was able to survive, holding up a human brain for illustrative purposes.

The Penguin publication of her book followed quickly thereafter. Since then, she has become a much sought-after speaker and is now working on a second book.

Wikler: Is your upcoming book aimed at stroke survivors?

Taylor: No, the first book was written for that population.

My new book, and the talks I give these days, are more about the anatomy of the brain in general, and specifically about the qualities of the left and right hemispheres, how they complement each other, how they work together and how you can actually use the two sides of your brain separately.

This is information everyone can use, whether you’re recovering from a brain injury or just seeking more balance in your life. The better you understand the brain, the better you can get it to do what you want it to do.

Wikler: How did you, a serious scientist, deal with the celebrity and publicity that followed the TED Talk and the publication of your first book? Oprah featured you on her SuperSoul program and has talked about what an inspiration you are to her. You were interviewed by Charlie Rose, by Terry Gross in her NPR program Fresh Air, you were invited to speak all around the world, and you still are.

Source: https://ceciliachorusny.org/updates-contact/dr-jill-bolte-taylor-fifty-trillion-molecular-geniuses

Stroke and Surviving Stroke: A Personal Story From Jill Bolte Taylor

Harvard-trained neuroscientist stroke of insight

From the WebMD Archives

It all started with a headache — pounding pain behind the left eye — that wouldn't go away.

A healthy 37-year-old at the time, Jill Bolte Taylor tried to shake the pain with a cardio workout. But that didn't work.

Feeling rocky, Taylor headed for her shower. She noticed herself losing coordination and struggling with balance — she had to lean against her shower wall.

The shower's roar startled her, and her sense of where her body began and ended was fading. “My perception of myself was that I was a fluid,” Taylor tells WebMD.

When she got the shower, her right arm flopped against her body. “Oh my gosh, I'm having a stroke!” Taylor later wrote in her book, My Stroke of Insight.

As a Harvard-trained brain scientist, Taylor knew far more about the brain, and strokes, than most people.

And although on one level she was fascinated by what she was experiencing, the planning part of her brain, which was sputtering, knew it was do or die.

Taylor writes that she wanted to lie down and rest. “But resounding thunder from deep within my being, a commanding voice spoke clearly to me: If you lie down now you will never get up!”

Taylor was experiencing a rare type of hemorrhagic (bleeding) stroke caused by a malformed connection — called an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) — between an artery and a vein in her brain.

The bleeding flooded parts of Taylor's brain involved with movement, speech, physical boundaries, and senses. As a result, the concept of calling “911” was lost to her.

Taylor struggled to remember her work phone number, scrawling the numbers on paper. She writes that the numbers looked “squiggles,” which she matched to the squiggles on her phone.

A co-worker answered, recognized Taylor's voice from her groans, rushed over, and got her to a hospital.

After being in the hospital for five days for her stroke, Taylor later had surgery to correct her AVM. The surgery was a success — but that was just the beginning of a stroke recovery that took eight years.

In the dozen years since her stroke, Taylor has fully recovered her abilities. She has written a memoir, appeared on Oprah's TV show, and delivered speeches about her stroke experience that have been widely viewed online.

Taylor tells WebMD she always ends her speeches by teaching her audience this STROKE symptom acronym:

S — speech or problems with language

T — tingling or numbness in your body

R — remember or any problems with memory

O — off balance or any problems with coordination

K — killer headache

E — eyes or any problem with vision

“You might have just one or two or three of these. Rarely are you going to have all of them,” Taylor says.

Most strokes are ischemic (clot-related) strokes, not bleeding strokes. And most bleeding strokes aren't caused by AVM. But any type of stroke is dangerous. Stroke is the No. 3 cause of death in the U.S. and a leading cause of disability.

Stroke is a medical emergency, so call 911 if you or someone else has stroke symptoms.

But Taylor says “a lot of people aren't going to call 911. There's a huge population of people who are just going to sit in denial of the whole thing.”

That denial can be deadly.

“The biggest problem that the medical facilities are having now is that people are not coming soon enough after stroke. They're delaying it.”

Taylor's advice: “If you're not comfortable calling 911, then call a friend and say, 'I'm having some neurological weirdness; call me back in 10 minutes or better yet, can you come over for a cup of coffee?'

“If that friend comes over and a half hour has passed, then that person's going to call 911,” Taylor says. “Statistics show that more people will call 911 on someone else than they'll call on themselves.”

Don't wait to see if possible stroke symptoms go away by themselves.

“As time passes, so does the ability to actually call 911… and you would never think that,” Taylor says. “You would think, 'I'm going to pick up a phone and I'm going to dial a number.'”

Taylor's stroke recovery included relearning to read, to walk on snow, and to do laundry — all with her mother's help. And she had to start from square one.

Taylor recalls her mother asking her, what's one plus one. “I paused for a moment, explored the contents of my mind, and responded, 'What's a one?'”

All that relearning took a lot of energy, and Taylor found herself needing 11 hours of sleep.

“The only way I got any rejuvenation was to go to sleep,” Taylor says. “When I go to sleep, I shut down all new stimulation coming into my brain. My brain has time to make some sense of the stimulation it's already received; it calms itself down, it organizes, it files information. … I needed people to let me sleep until I could wake.”

And during her waking hours, Taylor needed people around her who believed in her ability to recover, no matter how long it took.

Before she had her language skills back, Taylor relied on nonverbal cues her doctors and visitors displayed — their facial expressions, their body language, whether they were in a hurry or in a bad mood.

It took effort, energy, and time for her to try to listen and communicate. And she would try to gauge who was worth it, or, as she puts it, who “showed up” and slowed down and cared.

“If you do show up for me, then maybe I'm willing to show up for you. But if you don't show up for me, I'm certainly not going to show up for you, and I'm going to disconnect. And the more time I choose to disconnect, the more disconnected I am from even trying,” Taylor says.

Taylor now says she considers herself “110% functional” but different than before her stroke.

“In every way, I have recovered, but I have not returned to being the same person I was before,” she says.

What's changed? Her priorities.

Before the stroke, “I was much more 'me' oriented, much more career oriented,” Taylor says. “And now, I'm not that. Now, I'm much more about 'we.' How do I use the time that I have here to use my gifts to make a positive contribution to how we live our lives and for the health and well-being for other people who are in the place that I have been?”

The morning of Taylor's stroke, when her brain's left hemisphere — the chatty taskmaster side of the brain — fell silent, Taylor felt a deep sense of peace.

Today, she fosters that sense of peace when anger and fear start to rile her emotional circuitry.

She notices those angry or scared feelings, asks herself if she wants to feel that way, and shifts her attention to the present moment — often, to the weather.

“I look outside if I can. I look at trees that are blowing. I look at colors. I look at big pictures. I soften my eyes so I'm not focused on detail. I shift my mind consciously into the present moment and pay attention to the information coming in through my sensory system,” says Taylor, who calls the process “stepping to the right,” or shifting to her brain's right hemisphere.

It's a legacy from her stroke that Taylor says can work for anyone.

“It can make all the difference in the world,” she says.

SOURCES:

Jill Bolte Taylor, PhD, author, My Stroke of Insight.

CDC: “Stroke Facts and Statistics.”

© 2009 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.

Source: https://www.webmd.com/stroke/features/surviving-stroke-a-personal-story

Neuroscientist’s Stroke Raises Questions about the Relevance of Brain Science to Business

Harvard-trained neuroscientist stroke of insight

The naïve way we celebrate “right-brain creativity” in business is a gross oversimplication (and corruption) of the research done by Nobel laureate Roger Wolcott Sperry. It is much to be feared that the current infatuation with all things neuroscientific – or with things pretending to be neuroscience — will only intensify the silliness.

At least that’s what worries me.

So when Michael Maccoby, anthropologist, psychoanalyst, and author of the award-winning Harvard Business Review article “Narcissistic Leaders: The Incredible Pros, The Inevitable Cons” sent me an e-mail over the weekend, I was prepared to listen. “Have you seen this video of Jill Bolte Taylor?” he asked me in his e-mail. “Given your interest in the brain, I’d be interested in your reaction.”

Jill Bolte Taylor – in case you haven’t read her recently published memoir, My Stroke of Insight, or seen her on Oprah’s Soul Series —is a former Harvard neuroanatomist who suffered a stroke in 1996. During the attack, Taylor experienced what she calls “nirvana”; in recovery, she has advocated that people try to achieve these same ecstatic, blissful, oceanic feelings in their own lives.

With that in mind, I clicked on the link in Maccoby’s message – it led me to a clip of Taylor speaking last February at the prestigious Technology, Entertainment, Design (TED) conference.

The daughter of an Episcopal minister, Taylor exhibited all the charisma of a nineteenth-century revivalist.

At one point she even had a human brain carried out to her on stage, and she concluded with the rousing statement:

“Right here, right now I can step into the consciousness of my right hemisphere, where we are — I am —the life force power of the universe. I’m the life force power of the fifty trillion beautiful molecular genes that make up my form — at one with all that is.

” “Or I can choose to step into the consciousness of my left hemisphere, where I become a single individual…separate from the flow, separate from you. I am Dr. Jill Bolte Taylor, intellectual, neuroanatomist. These are the ‘we’ inside of me.

Which would you choose? Which do you choose? And when? I believe that the more time we spend choosing to run the deep inner peace circuitry of our right hemispheres, the more peace we will project into the world and the more peaceful our planet will be.”

I’m not making this stuff up. Taylor’s woolly mysticism won her a thunderous standing ovation from the impressive list of CEOs, scientists, creatives and philanthropists who each spent upwards of $4000 to attend the four-day TED forum for presenting innovative ideas. (Previous conferences have attracted illustrious speakers such as Bill Clinton, Bill Gates, Richard Branson and Al Gore.)

After reviewing the eighteen-minute video, I e-mailed Maccoby my immediate reaction: “Pseudoscience.” Maccoby agreed: “People are using the brain stuff to play out all kinds of fantasies and avoid real analysis. You will see more.”

That’s a scary thought. Indeed, since the New York Times published an article about Taylor in May, I’ve received a surprising number of links to the story from business friends and acquaintances who are eager to learn more about what goes on in the right hemisphere of the brain, as reportedly experienced by Taylor during her stroke.

I can’t predict how much Taylor’s ideas are going to influence the business community, but the current popularity of so-called right-brain exercises in management training programs augurs badly. Certainly, Jill Bolte Taylor’s stroke and everything it stirred up in her should give the rest of us plenty to consider.

She presents us with a fascinating chance to study the brain – and to honor a person’s enormous courage in the face of extraordinary difficulties. But we must listen to what Taylor says with a critical mind.

Can we honestly believe that “choosing to run the deep inner peace circuitry” of our collective right hemisphere is the way to run a business – or to project peace across the planet? I’m not trying to be facetious.

Time Magazine named Jill Bolte Taylor as one of the 100 most influential people in the world for 2008. That sends a sharp pain through both my hemispheres. I’d love to hear what, if anything, it does to yours.

Source: https://hbr.org/2008/07/neuroscientists-stroke-raises

My Stroke of Insight by Jill Bolte Taylor

Harvard-trained neuroscientist stroke of insight

The astonishing New York Times bestseller that chronicles how a brain scientist’s own stroke led to enlightenment On December 10, 1996, Jill Bolte Taylor, a thirty-seven- year-old Harvard-trained brain scientist experienced a massive stroke in the left hemisphere of her brain.

As she observed her mind deteriorate to the point that she could not walk, talk, read, write, or recall any of her life-all within four hours-Taylor alternated between the euphoria of the intuitive and kinesthetic right brain, in which she felt a sense of complete well-being and peace, and the logical, sequential left brain, which recognized she was having a stroke and enabled her to seek help before she was completely lost. It would take her eight years to fully recover.

For Taylor, her stroke was a blessing and a revelation. It taught her that by “stepping to the right” of our left brains, we can uncover feelings of well-being that are often sidelined by “brain chatter.

” Reaching wide audiences through her talk at the Technology, Entertainment, Design (TED) conference and her appearance on Oprah’s online Soul Series, Taylor provides a valuable recovery guide for those touched by brain injury and an inspiring testimony that inner peace is accessible to anyone.

The astonishing New York Times bestseller that chronicles how a brain scientist’s own stroke led to enlightenment On December 10, 1996, Jill Bolte Taylor, a thirty-seven- year-old Harvard-trained brain scientist experienced a massive stroke in the left hemisphere of her brain.

As she observed her mind deteriorate to the point that she could not walk, talk, read, write, or recall any of her life-all within four hours-Taylor alternated between the euphoria of the intuitive and kinesthetic right brain, in which she felt a sense of complete well-being and peace, and the logical, sequential left brain, which recognized she was having a stroke and enabled her to seek help before she was completely lost. It would take her eight years to fully recover.

For Taylor, her stroke was a blessing and a revelation. It taught her that by “stepping to the right” of our left brains, we can uncover feelings of well-being that are often sidelined by “brain chatter.

” Reaching wide audiences through her talk at the Technology, Entertainment, Design (TED) conference and her appearance on Oprah’s online Soul Series, Taylor provides a valuable recovery guide for those touched by brain injury and an inspiring testimony that inner peace is accessible to anyone.

The astonishing New York Times bestseller that chronicles how a brain scientist’s own stroke led to enlightenment. On December 10, 1996, Jill Bolte Taylor, a thirty-seven-year-old Harvard-trained brain scientist experienced a massive stroke in the left hemisphere of her brain.

As she observed her mind deteriorate to the point that she could not walk, talk, read, write, or recall any of her life—all within four hours­—Taylor alternated between the euphoria of the intuitive and kinesthetic right brain, in which she felt a sense of complete well-being and peace, and the logical, sequential left brain, which recognized she was having a stroke and enabled her to seek help before she was completely lost. It would take her eight years to fully recover.

For Taylor, her stroke was a blessing and a revelation. It taught her that by “stepping to the right” of our left brains, we can uncover feelings of well-being that are often sidelined by “brain chatter.

” Reaching wide audiences through her talk at the Technology, Entertainment, Design (TED) conference and her appearance on Oprah’s online Soul Series, Taylor provides a valuable recovery guide for those touched by brain injury and an inspiring testimony that inner peace is accessible to anyone.

Source: https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/304515/my-stroke-of-insight-by-jill-bolte-taylor/

About Dr. Jill

Harvard-trained neuroscientist stroke of insight
*** FOLLOW DR. JILL ON AT DrJBT! ***Dr. Jill Bolte Taylor is a Harvard-trained and published neuroanatomist who experienced a severe hemorrhage in the left hemisphere of her brain in 1996. On the afternoon of this rare form of stroke (AVM), she could not walk, talk, read, write, or recall any of her life. It took eight years for Dr.

Jill to completely recover all of her physical function and thinking ability. She is the author of the New York Times bestselling memoir My Stroke of Insight: A Brain Scientist's Personal Journey (published in 2008 by Viking Penguin). In 2008, Dr.

Jill gave a presentation at the TED Conference in Monterey, CA, which turned out to be the first TED talk to ever go viral through the internet. TED and Dr. Jill became world famous instantaneously and her TED talk is now one of the top 5 most viewed TED talks of all time.

This now famous 18-minute presentation catapulted her story into the public eye, and within six weeks of presenting that TED talk, Dr. Jill was chosen as one of TIME Magazine's 100 Most Influential People in the World for 2008, she was the premiere guest on Oprah's Soul Series web-cast, and her book My Stroke of Insight became a New York Times bestseller.Dr.

Jill feels passionate about helping others find their way back from neurological trauma, and is involved with the development of the upcoming feature film of her life. Dr.

Jill created the not-for-profit organization Jill Bolte Taylor BRAINS, which is dedicated to providing educational services and promoting programs related to the advancement of brain awareness, appreciation, exploration, education, injury prevention, neurological recovery, and the value of movement on mental and physical health, as well as other activities that support this purpose. The Brain Extravaganza was the not-for-profit's first educational awareness program and you can learn more about that community project at jbtbrains.org. In March of 2017, ten of these big brains will be on the Butler University campus as a part of their Butler ONE Brain Project. The brains will remain on display until after graduation. Dr. Jill remains the National Spokesperson for the Harvard Brain Tissue Resource Center (Harvard Brain Bank), and educates the public about the shortage of brain tissue donated for research into the severe mental illnesses. Since 1993, she has been an active member of NAMI (the National Alliance on Mental Illness) and is now president-emeritus of the NAMI Greater Bloomington Area affiliate in Bloomington, Indiana, after serving as the president for over ten years.

Official Biography

Dr. Jill Bolte Taylor is a trained and published neuroanatomist. Her research specialty was in the postmortem investigation of the human brain as it relates to schizophrenia and the severe mental illnesses.Because she has a brother who has been diagnosed with the braindisorder schizophrenia, Dr.

Taylor served for three years on the Board of Directors of National NAMI (National Alliance onMental Illness) between 1994-1997. (Currently she serves as President Emeritusof the Greater Bloomington Affiliate of NAMI in Bloomington, Indiana.

) Because there is a long term shortage of brain tissue donated forpostmortem research by individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia orbipolar disorder, Dr. Taylor travels as the NationalSpokesperson for the Mentally Ill for the Harvard Brain Tissue ResourceCenter (Harvard Brain Bank) located at McLean Hospital. Dr.

Taylor delivers a very popular keynote addresstitled “How To Get Your Brain To Do What You Want It To Do.” But as irony would have it, on December 10, 1996, Dr. Taylor woke up todiscover that she was experiencing a rare form of stroke, anarterio-venous malformation (AVM).

Two and a half weeks later, on December 27,1996, she underwent major brain surgery at Massachusetts GeneralHospital (MGH) to remove a golf ball size blood clot that was placingpressure on the language centers in the left hemisphere of her brain.

It took eight years for Dr.

Taylor to successfully rebuild herbrain – from the inside out. In response to the swelling and trauma ofthe stroke, which placed pressure on her dominant left hemisphere, thefunctions of her right hemisphere blossomed. Among other things,she now creates and sells unique stained glass brains when commissioned to do so.

In addition, shepublished a book about her recovery from stroke and the insights she gained into the workings of her brain.  The New York Times bestselling memoir is titled My Stroke of Insight: A Brain Scientist's Personal Journey and spent 17 weeks on the NY Times Bestseller list.

In February 2008, Dr. Taylor gave a presentation at the prestigious TED Conference. A video of that presentation was posted on the TED website which was immediately viewed by millions of people around the world. The response to the video launched Dr.

Taylor into becoming a highly sought-after public speaker. She was chosen by TIME  Magazine as one of the 100 Most Influential People in the World for 2008, and was the premiere guest on Oprah's Soul Series web-cast. In addition, she was interviewed by Oprah and Dr.

Oz on The Oprah Winfrey Show in October, 2008.

Dr. Taylor now serves as the CEO of My Stroke of Insight, Inc. and as the Chairman of the Board of the not-for-profit Jill Bolte Taylor BRAINS, Inc. She feels passionate about helping others findtheir way back from neurological trauma, and is excited about the upcoming feature film of herlife.

She created Jill Bolte Taylor BRAINS, a not-for-profitorganization dedicated to providing educational services and promotingprograms related to the advancement of brain awareness, appreciation, exploration, education, injuryprevention, neurological recovery, and the value of movement on mentaland physical health, as well as other activities thatsupport this purpose. She keynotes at conferences around the world and is having a wonderful time helping others learn more about their own brain, how it creates our perception of reality and how to distinguish between our own right and left hemisphere personalities and how we can build a healthy relationship between the two. 

For more information about Dr. Taylor's professional life, please see her complete CV (updated March 2011). Click here to listen to Dr. Taylor sing her Brain Bank Jingle.

Source: http://drjilltaylor.com/about.html

MedicaHealthShoppe.com